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Five Poses for the Summer Season!

Axis Yoga Trainings of Denver, Colorado - Yoga Teacher Training 200-Hour Program

Five Postures for the Summer Season!

Summer is in full swing!

There is so much to appreciate about this season; spending time outdoors, being more adventurous, travel and doing yoga on the deck!

Yoga teaches us that we are not separate from our environment. Our constitution is powerfully influenced by the seasons as is our temperament and disposition.  Certain seasons draw out different aspects of our being. Other environmental forces such as the people we hang out with or the food that we eat also influence us.

Sometimes things get out of balance, we experience disease or distress. One way that we can prevent such imbalance is to adapt our yoga practice to the season.

Summer asks us to be outside and spend time in the heat of the sun.  All of this is generally very healthy though it is important to off set some of this tendency with counter measures; the same way you might do “counter poses” to bring balance in asana practice.

Whether we recognize it our not, the mind and body are already constantly reacting/responding to environmental pressures. Intentionally adapting our practice helps us to adjust to the season in a way that prevents imbalance and promotes our greater wellbeing.

Five Key Cooling Postures:

I encourage you to adopt these postures 3-4 times a week, perhaps even more if you are spending additional time in the heat.  Remove any sense of urgency from the quality of your practice as you dedicate a minimum of 20 minutes to these postures in a room-temperature environment.

 

  • Generally speaking, forward folds are a boon for cooling the body, particularly when combined with longer holds (2-3 minutes).  Simple examples of these postures include paschimottanasana (seated forward fold) and upavistha-konasana (seated wide foot pose).

 

  • Sometimes billed as the “mother of all asanas” I recommend making time for salamba sarvangasana (supported shoulderstand).  Use the support of 2-3 folded blankets under the shoulders when going into the full posture to protect your neck or simple do ¾ shoulder stand in which the legs are not directly over the torso, rather the weight is shift back over the wrists and elbows.

 

  • Balasana, child’s pose.  This is a great pose in general for renewal and quieting the mind, particularly if we stay in it for 2-3 minutes.  Tip! When placing the forehead on the ground see that this skin is dragged down towards the eyebrows as opposed to lifted up towards the hairline.

 

  • Gentle backbends on stomach, such as shalabhasana . Because these postures require some additional effort, it is important to maintain relaxed awareness while practicing them.  

    According to ayurveda and yoga, the navel is regarded as the seat of the fire element in the body.  Generally speaking, poses that put pressure on this region help to “disperse” excess heat from the body.

 

  • Reclined twists.  Who doesn’t love an extended twist at the backend of practice?  Spend about a minute on each side to enhance the effect.

 

The more we practice yoga the more sensitive we become to outer influences and our inner world.  We learn to create balance between these two powerful realms and live in a greater state of integration.  An experienced teacher can give you further guidance about how to best integrate these postures and give additional suggestions.  I encourage you to supplement your practice with these postures to cultivate greater harmony during the summer season.

 

In Peace,

Derik

 

 

Are You Dedicated in Practice?

Axis Yoga Trainings of Denver, Colorado - Yoga Teacher Training 200-Hour Program

How often do we ask ourselves “Am I dedicated?”

Almost by definition, yoga is limitless.  Yoga helps us live more skillfully in the world and ultimately, move beyond the constraints of an embodied life.

From that perspective, all life experience is an opportunity to practice a yogic lifestyle and mindset.  The art of a yogic life begins when we roll up the mat or get off of the cushion. Formal practice is a bridge into the true test of our day to day interactions.

Generally speaking, the more we apply ourselves to dedicated, regular practice the more integrated our life becomes and we experience a greater degree of fulfillment.  Magic!

However, it is not always so simple.  Life circumstances and distracting habits can undermine our ability to practice.  It’s easy to get “caught up”. No matter how distracting our circumstances may have become, the spirit and promise of yoga is still there, patiently waiting.  It’s like the sun, who continues to shine regardless of how thick the clouds may be.

Here are four tips to help you engage in your practice more fully:

Treat Practice as a Duty

Baba Hari Dass, one of my primary teachers, stated that sadhana (one’s dedicated spiritual practice) is a “duty”.  From this perspective, yoga is less about a positive emotional experience as it is about being inwardly resourced so that we can tend to all of our life-responsibilities from a place of balance, dedication and aliveness.  He emphasized being committed to the process more so than attachment to the fruits of our efforts.

Sustainable Practice

Yoga is more like a marathon than a sprint race -it takes time to mature in the practice.  And like any discipline the more we practice the more adept we become. Consistency is the key.  This equation becomes remarkably simple when we commit to practicing, no matter how small, every day.  This approach will completely eliminate “tomorrow syndrome” and build momentum over time.

Encouragement

Admittedly, there are days when I feel less inclined to practice, days when the warmth of my sheets starts to overshadow my desire to be my best self.  It is in these moments I give myself a nudge by simply reminding myself that I will be much better off for having practiced, that “I will be glad I did it”.

Oftentimes it is the first few steps that are the most difficult and a sense of appreciation soon sets in, having surmounted the proverbial “mind over mattress”.  The next step to get to the sink and splash some cold water on my face. Works every time!

Seek Support

Getting outside support is beneficial for seasoned practitioners and beginners alike.  Support can look a lot of different ways though ideally it entails being in the physical presence of an adept teacher with whom you resonate.  There you will also find and receive the support of fellow and kindred yogis who are also on the path.

Ideally, this happens as frequently as possible.  For those who have an established home sadhana practice, and for whom their teacher lives far away, this could look like making the trip once every six months.

Of course, the proliferation of yoga studios also makes attending a regular class very accessible.  Or consider enrolling in a more advanced workshop, retreat or committing to an extended training.

In Closing….

Yoga, by its very nature, is intended to help us live more embodied lives and propels us to be the best version of ourselves.  Of course, the path is rarely a straight line as we traverse the varied landscape of our lives.  Regular practice with the support of community is the means by which we mature as yogis and bring the teachings into our everyday lives.

 

 

 

You’re Invited! 300 Hour Open House

Come find out more about Axis Yoga’s upcoming 300-hour yoga teacher training. This will be a great opportunity to experience a class, meet graduates, get your questions answered and get a taste of what Axis is all about!

Click here to RSVP and invite your friends!

When: Sunday, April 22 9:30-11am & Thursday, May 17 5:30-6:45pm
Where: Sixth Ave. UCC – Upstairs (3250 E. 6th Ave, Denver 80206)